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4.3.2.10 Adapting the coursebook

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    • #8707

      communityadmin
      Keymaster

      Here are some more practice items with the language point underlined.

      Would they be suitable for your students? Why or why not? If not, think of a good item to use instead.

      1. Describing dishes: Paella is a Spanish dish. It is made with rice and chicken or seafood.
      2. Practicing ‘might’: Don’t forget to take a pullover with you. You might be cold.
      3. Describing ability: I’m (not) very good at water-skiing
      4. Used to: I used to go to school by train.

      Post your ideas in a reply below and comment on other teachers’ ideas.

       

    • #8759

      Steven Herder
      Keymaster

      Describing dishes: Paella is a Spanish dish. It is made with rice and chicken or seafood.
      YES – Japanese students love to talk about food. These days there are more and more international restaurants, so students know more about other kinds of food. In the case that they don’t know, they can replace it with a Japanese dish. In a small group of 4 Ss, I’m sure they would know more than just Japanese dishes.

      Practicing ‘might’: Don’t forget to take a pullover with you. You might be cold.
      YES – We have a variety of seasons here in Japan, and we can also add words like sunglasses, an umbrella, a jacket, a hat, etc.

      Describing abilityI’m (not) very good at water-skiing.
      NO – Most students would not have tried water-skiing, but it would be easy to replace with cooking, singing karaoke, drawing pictures, making speeches, etc.

      Used to: I used to go to school by train.
      YES & NO – It depends on the context but probably most Ss still use a train. However, there are many easy replacements for “used to” such as: take swimming lessons, do calligraphy, go to Kumon, go to jyjuku, take piano lessons, etc.

      There seems to be a set number of after school activities that many Japanese Ss used to do. This makes for an easy springboard into discussions comparing each others’ experience.

    • #8788

      Rhett Burton
      Participant

      I always change the language to match the context, situation, and general lifestyle of my students.

      Describing dishes: Paella is a Spanish dish. It is made with rice and chicken or seafood.
      “Paella is a Spanish dish” is not too practical for my students. It doesn’t elicit any prior knowledge or desire to eat. I could easily change it to local food that the students have grown up eating. They would have a lot of prior knowledge of eating that food.

      Practicing ‘might’: Don’t forget to take a pullover with you. You might be cold.
      ” Don’t forget to take a pullover with you. You might be cold.”
      “Might” is very practical to learn. However, I would never use this language in this context. I could adapt ‘might’ into our context by talking about all the fun things students might do when the students are well-behaved.

      Describing ability: I’m (not) very good at waterskiing.
      “I’m (not) very good at waterskiing.”
      The pattern is very useful and practical. I would change waterskiing to (cutting, drawing, reading, cup stacking, jumping). I would make opportunities for this language to emerge through the activity that we were doing.

      Used to: I used to go to school by train.
      “I used to go to school by train.”
      This pattern is very useful, but the context isn’t. Instead, I would focus on an event that is more relevant to my learners. “I used to walk to the bus with my mom/ dad. Now, I walk to the bus by myself.” This is the transition between kindergarten and grade school that almost all children have in Korea.

      By adapting the language to my students’ life, I can use any materials and make them relevant. However, just because I can, doesn’t mean I will. I won’t go out and buy any book because I can adapt it. I am quite picky as to which books I use.

      • #8799

        Rhett – you demonstrate an excellent consideration of the relevance, usefulness, and appropriacy of the target language presented and how to adapt it to match your context and students’ needs, abilities, etc.

        That’s also a very fair point about being picky about which books you use and it’s understandable that you have taken the route of developing your own materials.

    • #8800

      Barbara Bujtás
      Participant

      1.
      Big yes, I would also use a picture of paella. Seafood is memorable because my students tend to either love it or hate it. Moreover, Spain is a frequent tourist destination so it may bring back memories.
      2.
      Yes. This is what all overly-worried Central Eastern Europen moms and grandmas say all the time. I would add a picture of a granny with a speech bubble.
      3.
      There is a waterskiing course here, but few people can afford really to learn it. I’d use football, singing, cooking, drawing, etc.
      4.
      I might not use it. It’s not too lifelike to go to school by train around here. I’d rather go for walking to school or other school-related habits. I want to the same primary as most of my primary and secondary students, which makes it really interesting for them.

      • #8805

        Barbi – you easily connect each of these language points to your learners’ lives and experiences.

        With #2 (might) and #4 (used to) I think it’s more valuable to consider what functions and situations we wish them to serve. For example, rather than “practicing ‘might'”, we could be “Persuading a teenager to well-prepared for a camping trip”

        In general, we can often apply a particular target language to different functions and/or situations. So we could easily adjust the above to something quite different, e.g. “Reminding a father to be well-prepared for their first flight with a baby”, e.g. Remember to pack extra clothes for you in your carry-on luggage. (Baby Z) might throw up on you, too!

    • #11085

      Masatoshi Shoji
      Participant

      Would they be suitable for your students? Why or why not? If not, think of a good item to use instead.

      Describing dishes: Paella is a Spanish dish. It is made with rice and chicken or seafood.
      Practicing ‘might’: Don’t forget to take a pullover with you. You might be cold.
      Describing ability: I’m (not) very good at water-skiing
      Used to: I used to go to school by train.

      I think #1 and #2 are really good examples. However, some students do not know what pull-over is.
      Need to show a picture or replica.
      As for #3, water-skiing can be changed to playing basketball as it is a popular sport but not everyone is good at.
      Concerning #4, by train can be changed to on foot as not many students go to school by train in many areas.

      • #11092

        Good point about ‘pullover’ (or ‘jumper’) which is more common in BrE, for example, as opposed to ‘sweater’ (AmE), which Japanese students will be more familiar with. Depending on the season, you’ll be able to ask students about their pullovers.

        Nice changes to ‘water-skiing’ and ‘train’ to suit your local context, too. Another option is to ask students to personalize the sentences themselves.

    • #11086

      Masatoshi Shoji
      Participant

      Maybe it’s a nice idea to make a full list of extracurricular activities with pictures in future.

      • #11094

        Yes, sets of pictures and flashcards are great resources to have. I use 2 picture dictionaries, mostly now but miss the hundreds of flashcards I had access to in language school (a.k.a. eikaiwa in Japan).

        These days, however, there are also a lot of online/app options, too, and Quizizz, for example, is proving very fun, useful, and easy.

    • #13311

      scott gray
      Participant

      Describing dishes: Paella is a Spanish dish. It is made with rice and chicken or seafood.
      it is made with X or Y. Having them describe typical Japanese foods they eat is also good for home stays as they have something they can talk to their home stay family with.
      Practicing ‘might’: Don’t forget to take a pullover with you. You might be cold.

      might is good for my kids as many don’t try to take steps to think ahead and helping them guess ahead or have possibilities in addition to its usefulness in their daily life. It might be on the test. You might want to write that down.
      Describing ability: I’m (not) very good at water-skiing Used to: I used to go to school by train.

      These are both good to get kids to make friends or learn about people they don’t know. As many of my students are at my school because of lack of social skills these are useful to learn for not just English but learning to socialize and be involved in a conversation.

      • #13320

        Excellent consideration for your students, relevant situations, meaningful purpose, and language within their abilities.

        Several of the target structures might even be later combined and used in a role-play with students trying to agree on plans for a weekend trip with exchange students, for example, with secret information for different roles regarding abilities, preferences, and past experiences.

    • #13315

      Jessica Sohn
      Participant

      Would they be suitable for your students? Why or why not? If not, think of a good item to use instead.

      Describing dishes: Paella is a Spanish dish. It is made with rice and chicken or seafood.
      Yes. If it’s related to any reading or something it would be a more nice introduction. Showing pictures and a video clip to introduce and then go in to something like “My favorite food” and have them give a short presentation in pairs. I think it can be a good learning experience because kids in Korea just love talking about food too.

      Practicing ‘might’: Don’t forget to take a pullover with you. You might be cold.
      Yes. I would use some other words together like jacket, sweater, hat, gloves, boots etc.

      Describing ability: I’m (not) very good at water-skiing
      Yes. Kids love to talk about themselves. I’d use some more action words that they may be familiar with. (like skating, swimming, soccer, singing etc)

      Used to: I used to go to school by train.
      Yes. I think I’d tie up this with their life before Covid-19 to now. They have a lot to say about their transitions in life.
      I think I can use it to introduce transportation vocab together.

      • #13322

        Well thought out, Jessica, with consideration for your young learners. In addition to topics/vocabulary, what kinds of functions and situations might you add, for example, with might?

    • #13347

      Rhett Burton
      Participant

      Describing dishes: Paella is a Spanish dish. It is made with rice and chicken or seafood.
      This could be fun for learners because you could make up some really silly food- “What is Bugalot Soup? It is a soup made from a variety of bugs. There are flies, caterpillars, and butterfly wings. Would you like to try?”

      Practicing ‘might’: Don’t forget to take a pullover with you. You might be cold.
      I like using ‘might’ and ‘maybe’ as a form of reward. Examples I use – “We might do this if we finish this task. Can we play a game? Maybe. Are you finished writing your letters?”

      Describing ability: I’m (not) very good at water-skiing
      I like this pattern because it gives students the ability to express what they haven’t learned to be proficient at yet. It is often easier to see things we can’t do vs. things we can do. If I teach my students to say something like, “I am not good at writing yet.” it may empower them to practice more and/or understand why repeating an exercise, activity, or task.

      Used to: I used to go to school by train.
      I like this pattern when referring to students interests, attitudes, skills, and content creation. I want to help them notice the changes and improvements that they have made over the days, weeks, months, and, for some, years.

      All these language points can/will emerge in my interactions with my students, but they will always be made salients to the context/ situation we are in.

      • #13350

        Nice fun variation for describing dishes! Reminds me, too, of Do you like bananas? Do you like soup? … Do you like banana soup?!

        For might, how might you get students using it too?

        Nice addition of yet to I’m not good at ~ … it’s a small yet powerful word!

    • #17122

      Rhett Burton
      Participant

      I like to keep all learning associated with the classroom or a shared remembered experience for my young learners.I can easily use these forms (made with, might, good at, used to) within the textbook usage.

      made with

      The other day, I used “Pizza Topple”, a board game, to role-play ordering food. ‘made with’ could be easily applied to include other toppings so that the pizzas can be personalized for the students. “This pizza is made with the best pizza sauce.”

      might

      I do a lot of timed cup-stacking. Students are always competing against their previous scores. I always ask the students if they will be able to do it faster. I usually use ‘maybe,’ but I could tweak it and get them to learn “might.”

      Used to

      We used to write our ABCs every day. Now, we don’t. We learned them. Now we are writing words and sentences. I can use this chunk of language each time I want my students to see that something has changed. Note – Visual changes are much more easily spotted and usually require a lot less energy to see elicit “used to”. The TV used to be there. Now it is here.

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